Cases

  • A Cure for Loneliness - After recently being widowed, Jillian is deeply depressed and her health declines. When her three out-of-state adult children are alerted, they admit her to the ACE unit and worry that Jillian will resist enrolling in a skilled nursing facility.
  • A Fly on the Wall - Observe an experienced science teacher engage her ninth grade Biology students with the help of Virtual Lab. This NASA-inspired technology simulates high resolution microscopes and easily downloads onto any computer. In this class, students learn the features of Virtual Lab, practice technology skills, and realize that science can be fun.
  • A Fork in the Road - Tina Reynolds worries about the difficult situations that her students face each day, both at Coral Bay Middle School and in their community. She is particularly concerned with one of her 8th graders, Joseph Rios. Jo-Jo, as he is known to his peers, is making some bad choices these days. But what, if anything, can Tina do to help him? How can she convince him that joining a gang is the worst possible thing he could do?
  • A Matter of Conviction - Dr. Maria Cohen, principal of Elmwood High School, runs headlong into a conflict of professional values over the use of tests to measure and guide instruction. How can she foster a vision of student learning and staff professional growth that is shared and supported by the school community?
  • A New School of Thought - A student teaching assignment at an urban high school prompts Casey to rethink reading instruction. She's impressed when she observes a teacher use hip hop to teach Shakespeare, but her university peers aren't all receptive to this unorthodox teaching strategy.
  • A Piece of the Pie - Paramount High School is in dire need of resources, especially when it comes to their sports program. When a local business owner offers some support, though, it comes with a price. Health teacher Noelle Woods-Madson and Coach Moe Sloan can?t see eye-to-eye on the issue, so they put the ball in their principal?s court.
  • A Special Situation - How special are students in special education? Should they be expected to follow the rules at West Winds High School, or do they deserve special treatment?
  • Academy of Environmental Science High School - Despite being advised to not make too many changes, the new principal at AES leads his staff, students, and parents forward in the initial steps on a planned journey of change.
  • Adventure at the Speed of Sound - A science teacher and a math teacher collaborate to have their students collect and graph data on the speed of sound. What begins as a novel idea becomes a logistical nightmare as one teacher attempts to include several learning disabled students, and, later, discovers that the group work has not been shared equally.
  • All Aboard the Differentiation Train - Joan King, the principal of Pemberton Elementary School, is conducting her annual faculty evaluations. The school has recently embarked on a differentiation initiative. Mrs. King is challenged by the fact that one of the teachers models an exemplary lesson while the other has not demonstrated any differentiation at all.
  • All in a Days Work - Linda Matthews, a special education teacher, struggles to meet the needs of students with autism and emotional-behavioral disturbances. Working productively with students, colleagues, administrators, and parents all present exhausting challenges lacking easy answers.
  • All the News that’s Fit to Teach - Four teachers at Garfield Junior High School team up with the newspaper editor to develop an interdisciplinary unit with the newspaper as the basis of the curriculum. The teachers struggle to decide what "interdisciplinary" really means. They wonder if working together--long said to be a great idea--can be tougher than going it alone.
  • Along For The Ride - Shauquan struggles to pay attention in class while Terrell puts on a show for everyone, including Mr. Harris.
  • Anchorage Police Department: Cultural Diversity - Officers at the Anchorage Police Department in Anchorage, Alaska work with culturally diverse populations. Nuances in language and behavior require officers to adapt their methods for solving conflicts. The broad range of perspectives here highlights the internal processes officers use to address the needs of the community.
  • Australia – School in the Air - Providing education to students in the Australian Outback is complicated by the vast distances between students and the rugged terrain that separates them. This case examines some issues involved in providing quality, distance education for those students.
  • Benjamin Cardozo High School - Some see large, urban high schools as impersonal. But Cardozo High in Queens is an exception. The principal, faculty, and even the students there are serious about the school mission: "A School of Excellence AND a School with a Heart." Even so, some students struggle to find their niche.
  • Best of Both Worlds - Like many elementary educators, Cathy Wong provides her young students with hands-on, interactive learning experiences. But providing instruction in both English and Mandarin adds a unique challenge to lesson planning. Cathy draws on her students' first language knowledge as she helps them develop both their mathematical skills and fluency in two languages.
  • Beyond the Textbook: School of the Future - Visitors to the School of the Future quickly recognize they are not in a "traditional" school. In its second year of existence, the school seems to be doing everything differently, from the way they refer to students and teachers to the way they deliver curriculum. Their project-based learning approach encourages new ways of thinking about teaching and learning.
  • Big Sister - Elizabeth is embarrassed when she learns what her sister Stacy has been up to at school.
  • Boiling Point - Coach Jacobs' substitution of a player during a soccer game stirs up complaints from the player and his father.
  • Borders and Barriers - Students and teachers at ethnically diverse Aldebaron High School struggle with literal and figurative borders as they work together on an interdisciplinary project. Teachable moments, racial bias, and issues of accountability pose unexpected problems along the way.
  • Boxed In - Seventh grade science teacher Pauline LaFleur has spent a lot of time refining rubrics with her colleagues. Nonetheless, they don't quite provide the support she needs to evaluate the work of two exceptionally creative students who also happen to be contenders for the gifted education program at her school. The ways we measure intellect, creativity, and academic prowess are subject to interpretation in this case focusing on assessment and individuality.
  • Branching Out - A principal asks teachers to work together on an interdisciplinary unit meant to promote critical thinking, self-directed learning, and diversity. Teachers have to integrate their disciplines without sacrificing time needed to master specific content. 'How am I supposed to fit Latin American history into pre-algebra?' The project encourages teachers to branch out and take risks for the sake of student learning.
  • Breathing New Life Into Instruction - The new district-wide initiative to improve classroom instruction takes the director of instruction and three specialists to a summer institute for professional development. After learning about exemplary instructional practices and watching them modeled in demonstration classrooms, the team returns to Cantor City Public Schools to "breath life" into classroom instruction.
  • Building a Better Future - In 2004, Pennsylvania Governor Edward G. Rendell signed Act 183, establishing an "E-Fund" so that school districts throughout the Commonwealth without access to high-speed internet could purchase quality broadband access and service. Years later, how have these funds changed the educational landscape of Pennsylvania? In this case, educators and administrators from a variety of districts the discuss the implementation of Act 183, its effects, and how technology is changing the way learning happens, both inside and outside the classroom.
  • Burgers and Scoreboards - Dr. Cooper, principal at Brandon High School, did not realize that the offer made by Sam Graham to pay for new scoreboards and provide free food would become a controversy. Many teachers and community members feel that placing the logo of Sam's restaurant on the football team's helmets is too high a price to pay.
  • Buying Time - Teachers simply can't do it all! And neither should gifted students. This case considers curriculum compacting to "buy time" for differentiated educational programming for gifted learners.
  • Buying Time to Enrich Learning - A gifted education teacher struggles to convince a reluctant colleague of the merits of curriculum compacting for gifted students.
  • Can Anyone Hear Me? - Hillendale High School serves students with chronic behavior issues who have been expelled from their former schools. The school's principal, Mr. McCree, leads with an iron hand in a velvet glove'through tough love. What he offers through firm caring, he lacks in instructional leadership. A new student in desperate need of help brings issues of confidentiality, communication, and a teacher's need for clarity to the front burner.
  • Carrying the Vision - New principal Becky Baker faces numerous challenges as her first year at Bland Valley Middle School begins. One week before school starts, Becky is already balancing demands from her staff and the superintendent.
  • Caught Ya! - Natalia Marquez wants to do well in school, but math is just too hard. During a quiz on decimals and fractions, she is accused of cheating.
  • CEB School for Public Service - Administradores y maestros del Colegio CEB para Servicio Publico- Bushwick se ven si mismos como lideres ciudadanos responsables para el bienestar de su comunidad. CEB pone un enfasis en cambiar la comunidad no del exterior pero desde adentro.
  • Change Can Be a Challenge - Money, money, money. It may not solve all the problems schools face, but its scarcity can certainly make life difficult. Bruce Norbert, principal of Prairiedale Middle School, learns that sometimes creative collaboration is the best response to a financial shoe that pinches. If a community can't afford a new school it may be able to propose solutions that cause people to rethink the meaning of educational life - but only if stakeholders buy in and authorities approve changes.
  • Charting A New Path - At Riverside Elementary School, gifted students from traditionally underrepresented groups attend summer school to extend their learning on the general curriculum and prepare for the upcoming school year. These Young Scholars benefit from supportive teachers committed to a model of instruction focused on critical thinking and real-world problem solving.
  • Cisco Training Video - Cisco Learning Institute Training Video.
  • Click and Drag - Instructional Technology Director Kate Green is impressed when she observes high school teacher Shelby Duncan introduce her web-based unit on volcanoes. Later, however, Shelby doubts she's met the needs of low- and high-level readers. At another school, fourth-grade teacher Melissa Mendel struggles with behavior management issues in the computer lab. Kate wonders how she can help teachers use technology effectively.
  • Clinical Perspectives - Clinical perspectives on caring for the elderly provided by gerontological caregivers working in the Akron area.
  • Columbus, New Mexico - A border town elementary school in Columbus, New Mexico, deals daily with the complexities of educating American children born of Mexican parents. The English-speaking teachers who teach in a bilingual program encounter parental hesitation from those who want their children to learn English only.
  • Compare and Contrast - Fifth grade teacher Huck Phillip faces grouping challenges as he tries to meet the different needs of students in reading, writing, and mathematics. Using formal and informal assessments, anecdotal notes, and the input of the reading specialist, Huck strives to set objectives for students that connect to school improvement goals and maximize individual student growth.
  • Conceptualizing Differentiated Curriculum for the Gifted - The gifted education coordinator for the Newberry School District meets with teachers regarding the level of challenge provided for advanced and gifted learners. Gifted education specialists at the elementary and high schools work with teachers on a curriculum-writing project to develop concept-based units of study.
  • Conducting Learning - All the students in Martha Kueffner's first-grade classroom are identified gifted learners. However, there is no shortage of complex needs to be addressed, including supporting various learning styles, support for English Language Learners, and differing levels of socio-emotional development.
  • Connect the Dots - Despite teaching 170 students at a gifted and talented middle school in Brooklyn, Chris Casaccio finds ways to make connections among art, film, literature, history, and writing. Connecting with each student proves a little more challenging, even for a dedicated teacher like her.
  • Copy Cat - Elizabeth meets her friend Marty at their usual spot in the park for some afternoon fun.
  • Counselor Takes Counsel - After attending an inspiring workshop on the socio-emotional needs of gifted students, Clara Hayes, a resource teacher at Burnside Middle School, tries to initiate a collaborative partnership with Mary Barnes, the school counselor. Excited about the possibilities and determined to make a difference, Clara is surprised by the resistance to her ideas.
  • Courage to Communicate - Working with end-stage dementia patients is a challenge. An interdisciplinary team of caregivers strives to communicate with their nonverbal patient to provide compassionate care. The team explores the ethical and moral implications of managing patients with terminal conditions.
  • Course I: Introduction to Imaginative Learning: Entering the Study of Works of Art - What is imaginative learning? Why should my students study works of art? Why is it important? In this introductory course, participants will explore the answers to these questions through an experiential workshop around Ghostcatching, a work of art choreographed and performed by Bill T. Jones in collaboration with digital artists Shelley Eshkar and Paul Kaiser, and through the Capacities for Imaginative Learning, which are a set of possible outcomes that may occur when aesthetic education is used in the study of an artwork. Aesthetic education is the basis of Lincoln Center Institute's approach to teaching and learning.
  • Course II: Teaching for Imaginative Learning: Creating Curriculum - Now that you have some idea of imaginative learning through aesthetic education, its practice, and possible outcomes, you are ready to learn more about how Lincoln Center Institute approaches creating curriculum. In this course, you will explore how the Institute plans its instructional units, including the use of multimedia and multidisciplinary resources to deepen your connections to Ghostcatching. You will utilize what you have learned in the introductory course, as well as view the work of Institute teaching artists and teachers in elementary, middle, and secondary education, to help you understand this unique approach to curriculum that opens possibilities for learning.
  • Course II: Teaching for Imaginative Learning: Curriculum and Pedagogy - Now that you have some idea of imaginative learning through aesthetic education, its practice, and possible outcomes, you are ready to learn more about how Lincoln Center Institute approaches curriculum and pedagogy. In this course, you will explore how the Institute plans its instructional units, and how to do what we call "Guiding the Noticing," a major component of our instructional approach. You will utilize what you have learned in the introductory course, as well as view the work of Institute teaching artists and teachers in elementary, middle, and secondary education, to help you understand this unique approach that opens possibilities for learning.
  • Course III: Integrating Curriculum and Pedagogy for Imaginative Learning - In the past two courses, you have been introduced to imaginative learning, the study of works of art, and Lincoln Center Institute's curriculum and pedagogy. Prior to trying this work on your own, we'd like you to spend time deepening the possible connections you might have to Ghostcatching and creating truly rich lessons that connect to your curriculum and your students' lives in a variety of ways. In the next, and final, course in this sequence, you will get to test out your wings!
  • Course IV - In this final course in Lincoln Center Institute's series, you get the chance to try out what you've learned in the previous three courses with the guidance of the course facilitator and the support of your online learning community. Experiment with bringing Ghostcatching to life in your classroom, reflect on what you and your students have learned, and set out to bring imaginative learning through aesthetic education to your classroom on a regular basis. The only limit is your own imagination!
  • Cultivating Community at the School of the Future - It's not easy planting a large, modern school prominently in a historic city park, let alone convincing the surrounding residents to blindly trust the school's motives for coming into their community. At the School of the Future, resistance to the school and its selection practices mingles with hope for its possibilities, not only for the students who attend, but for all who live nearby.
  • Culture and Communications Resource Center - Culture and communication are inextricably linked. Use this resource center to learn more about the ways they are connected and how these connections affect learning, achievement, and social interactions, for students and families.
  • Dallas ISD: New Teacher Induction - Case Study is based on Clarence Bowles, a fictitious first year teacher. His experiences reflect the concerns of all new teachers. You will learn how he interacts with his mentor and how they work together to improve classroom instruction. Also included in the Case Study are interviews with real teachers from the Dallas ISD discussing techniques and resources to promote student achievement.
  • Dealing with Data - When Dr. Emma Gutierrez takes over at Sequoia Elementary School, she takes on a range of problems. There are so many indications of failure she hardly knows where to begin - falling test scores, declining real estate values, an increasing number of staff jumping ship, and shifting demographics. Corinna Armstrong's withdrawal is typical. She's a bright second grader whose parents have decided to move to a suburban school where they believe she'll be more appropriately challenged.
  • Deming, New Mexico - This case explores the challenges of teaching in a border town where teachers face bilingualism, cultural barriers, and minimal resources. Controversy comes from those who feel the non-native students should have to pay tuition to attend the American middle school.
  • Disappearing Act - Marty is having a hard time keeping track of his homework and his home life ever since his parents split.
  • Do the Math - Two high school teachers, their department chair, and the instructional technology coordinator struggle to find ways to instruct students at many different levels of mathematical understanding.
  • Down But Not Out - A new initiative for identifying economically disadvantaged gifted learners in the Lawrence School District is raising hope and fears. Sharika, a bright fifth-grader, possesses academic performance extremes as both strengths and weaknesses that bewilder some of the school staff at Delta School. The gifted education specialist finds herself fighting an uphill battle in getting Sharika identified for middle school gifted education services.
  • EBC High School for Public Service - Administrators and teachers of EBC High School for Public Service-Bushwick view themselves as citizen leaders responsible for the well-being of their community. EBC emphasizes changing the community not from the outside but from within.
  • El Puente Academy for Peace and Justice - El Puente Academy for Peace and Justice teaches students to choose service over self-interest because it builds a sense of community and creates stewards who understand the larger circle of learning.
  • Enhancing Learning: Hatboro-Horsham High School - In the second year of their Classrooms for the Future (CFF) grant, teachers at Hatboro-Horsham High School are learning that technology is more than another student engagement device. New challenges require teachers to look at assessment and curriculum, all the while acclimating to the new pace of planning, teaching, and learning at the school. While evidence of the initiative's success will not surface immediately, the school is beginning to see the lasting benefits of their new environment.
  • Enough is Enough - Joseph Williams faces many challenges beyond those of the average sophomore. He has been diagnosed with ADD and anxiety problems, has difficulty juggling his classes and assignments, and feels at odds with his classmates. Meet Joseph, and test your knowledge of the legal requirements and instructional options open to educators who address the needs of students like him.
  • Enriching Enrichment - Identifying the talents of students from different cultural backgrounds and with varying language needs provides both challenges and opportunities for teachers working with diverse populations. The faculty at PS 152 in Queens has embraced this challenge by implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM).
  • Fair Means… - Faced with the mandated policy of full inclusion, a special education teacher attempts to insure that all of her students receive an appropriate education. Unfortunately, the teachers and students at Longdale Middle School are not cooperating.
  • Fighting Chance - Teachers working on a Title I Schoolwide Plan meet unexpected resistance when their school's data presents a bleak picture of student performance. Challenges surrounding public relations, consensus building, developing clear and measurable goals, and making meaningful use of test data all muddy the water on this journey toward school improvement.
  • Finding a Focus - Mt. Eagle Elementary is finding new ways to incorporate the Young Scholars model into their curriculum. During a unit on biographical filmmaking, teachers work cooperatively to prepare students for the coming school year, using materials and sources that relate to the lives of the diverse student population.
  • Finding Their Way - Adjusting to life after high school is a challenge. So many things have changed, it's sometimes hard to cope. Andy worries about grades and a difficult roommate situation. Alicia feels like she's losing contact with old friends, especially Susan. Kayla and Carlos both seem caught up in their new lives. And David is lonely and far from home.
  • Foreign Language Academy of Global Studies (FLAGS) - Staff and faculty of FLAGS focus on relational leadership--a concept that requires support and commitment from all stakeholders. They use their resources efficiently to provide opportunities for shared decision making.
  • Freedom Area Senior High School - For decades, Freedom educated students from rural and manufacturing communities to meet the needs of the local economy. Now, Freedom's students must compete in a global economy, and the community seeks new ways to prepare its students for the digital future. In this case, administrators, faculty, families, and students respond to efforts to integrate technology into the core curriculum.
  • Friend or Foe - As a first-year special education teacher at Ringburg Elementary, Cindy Jacobs navigates the sensitive territory of autism in the classroom and with the family. Despite the input of many qualified specialists, concerned parents, and a hardworking staff, it's not easy to know what's best for her student, Randy Mueller.
  • General McLane High School - Principal Rick Scaletta had hopes that giving each teacher a laptop would foster greater technology integration within and between classrooms. Yet, General McLane High School continues to lag behind Scaletta's expectations for technology use in teaching and learning. While General McLane's school leaders wonder if they should even apply for the Classrooms for the Future grant, they work to improve the use of technology through teacher technology cohorts.
  • Get Lost - Marty Phillips is suffering from a rough transition to middle school. Isolated from his peers, he finds comfort in the world of books. Meet Marty and the English teacher who tries to motivate him.
  • Get the Picture - Carlos' mother is a little too enthusiastic about his college plans, while Alicia's mom doesn't want her to go to school at all. Meanwhile, Susan is devastated when she hears back from the colleges she applied to.
  • Glimpses into Differentiated Classrooms - A local school district has been piloting differentiation efforts in a number of classrooms at various grade levels over the past school year. Current fiscal constraints have placed many initiatives in a precarious position for the upcoming school year. The curriculum coordinator for the district wonders whether or not a trip to model differentiated classrooms can convince school board members to continue to fund their endeavors.
  • Gridlock - When Monique D'Anjou is regularly absent from school, both she and her teachers struggle to deal with missing work, grades, and attendance issues.
  • Grouping Gridlock - A group of fourth-grade teachers follow their principal's edict to group students by ability for math and language arts instruction. The teachers divide their students according to existing test scores only to find out that they have left an identified gifted child out of the advanced math class.
  • Hatboro-Horsham High School - With its vision and plan already in place, Hatboro-Horsham High School put its Classrooms for the Future grant money to good use. District leaders placed five content-specific technology coaches in the school. The intent is for the coaches to encourage technology integration throughout the curriculum, creating the conditions for differentiated instruction.
  • Helping Struggling Students - Gertie finds it difficult to reconcile the high academic challenge that is part of the school's mission with students who struggle but do not always succeed in her classes. She thinks these students are working hard but not finding success, and she does not know how to meet their needs while remaining true to the school's mission.
  • Here to Serve - Alex Rutter, a 15-year old boy who stutters and has classified learning and behavior disabilities, is accused of accessing a porn site in the computer lab. Questions arise related to appropriate punishment, ineffective filters in school computers, and lack of appropriate supervision in the computer lab.
  • High School for Law and Public Service - The principal and staff of the High School for Law and Public Service (HSLPS) believe shared leadership requires collaborative classrooms and curricula that motivate both students and teachers.
  • Hop, Skip, and a Jump: A Close Look at Grade Acceleration - The case surrounds the issues of socio-emotional development in gifted learners. The staff at Bethany Elementary School is faced with the challenge of providing the best educational environment to a very bright first-grader. When the option of grade acceleration comes up, many of the staff reveal typical myths and stereotypes about the social or emotional development of gifted learners.
  • Hurry Up and Wait - Susan and her friends struggle to figure out what they want out of life.
  • In The Classroom - Teachers use a variety of approaches to present material and manage behaviors. In these videos you'll see teachers and students working in different content areas in a range of settings.
  • In The Mix - Kayla gets a new job that helps her decide what to do after high school. She gives Andy a ride to tour a four-year.
  • Invisible - When Marta's mother can't take care of her any more, she's forced to move in with her grandmother and start over at a new school.
  • JHU Training - Four scenes from classrooms around the country capture some of the difficulties facing teachers in urban classrooms. Behavior intervention, conflict resolution, hands-on learning, and classroom management issues are raised.
  • Just Sick About It - First-year resource teacher Reggie Swift finds out how demanding her job can be as she tries to negotiate her tricky new working environment, satisfy her job responsibilities, and meet the needs of her special learners, all in the same day.
  • Just Talking Shop - Susan, Alicia, and David all plan to do something after high school. But what? How do they know what the right decision is?
  • Keeping it to Myself - Carlos' mother pushes him to prepare for college. She signs him up for an SAT prep course, and they're both surprised by how well he does. It looks like college might really happen for him. He and his friend Kayla meet with their guidance counselor, Ms. Lopez, to get more information on next steps.
  • Keeping Score - Fresh from training in assessment, Principal Toomey has a vision of student success driven by academic achievement. When he observes reading instruction in a fifth-grade classroom, he is puzzled by what he observes. A post-observation conference between teacher and principal reveals profound differences of opinion about children's needs. How can Toomey promote a vision of learning while also nurturing the professional development of this young teacher?
  • Kid Magnet - When elementary technology specialist Margie Coles begins working with students after school on website design, she is delighted to see them fully engaged in higher-order thinking. These successes lead her to reconsider her use of technology in the classroom. Should all students be using technology this way?
  • Kings of the Hill - Carrie Carter, a third-year teacher at Bay Cove Middle School, must confront a problem she has never faced when two boys accused of cyberbullying are moved into her class.
  • La Controverse du Foulard - La Controverse du Foulard presente Naima, une etudiante Islamique dans une ecole Francaise. L'etudiante porte un foulard sur sa tete, au nom de ses convictions religieuses.
  • LCI Workshop - What is imaginative learning? Why is it important for my students to study works of art? In this introductory workshop, participants explore the answers to these questions through an experiential workshop around Ghostcatching (a work of art choreographed and performed by Bill T. Jones in collaboration with digital artists Shelley Eshkar and Paul Kaiser) and through the Capacities for Imaginative Learning, which are a set of possible outcomes that may occur when Imaginative Learning: The Lincoln Center Institute Practice is used in the study of an artwork. Imaginative Learning is the basis of Lincoln Center Institute's approach to teaching and learning.
  • Learning in Two Languages: Aprendiendo en Dos Idiomas - Sadie Herrera teaches in a 50-50 dual language classroom designed to transition students whose first language is Spanish to English-only classrooms. Sadie knows her second graders benefit from learning content and skills in two languages, but the pressure of keeping pace with the regular second grade curriculum makes Sadie feel rushed.
  • Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences Resource Center - Learning styles and multiple intelligences affect teaching and learning in complex ways. Use this resource center to examine your own preferences, increase your understanding of your students' tendencies, and explore strategies for using this knowledge to maximize learning.
  • Lesson Study - Lesson study is a Japanese approach to professional development. It involves small groups of educators working together in a collaborative process. Teachers set goals and accomplish them by employing the "lesson study cycle."
  • Lessons to be Learned - Bert Kamen, an eighth grade student at Coral Bay Middle School, has been the subject of teasing and harassment by several of his peers since elementary school. Mr. Sam Chambers, science teacher and Nurse Sallee Charley are concerned about Bert and have taken special interest in him.
  • Let Us Pray - Principal Mark Estment leads a school community that is comprised in part by a vocal contingent of fundamentalist Christian students and parents. They frequently raise questions about the school curricula. When students use the National Honor Society induction ceremony as an occasion to pray, Estment is drawn into a larger context of political, social, legal, and cultural values that places his stewardship of the school in jeopardy.
  • Ligar os Pontos - Apesar de ensinar a 170 alunos numa escola do terceiro ciclo do ensino bá;sico para estudantes talentosos, em Brooklyn- Nova Iorque, Chris Casaccio tenta encontrar formas para interligar a arte, o cinema, a literatura, a história e a escrita. Relacionar-se com cada aluno torna-se um desafio, mesmo para uma professora dedicada como ela o é.
  • Lincoln Center Institute Video - All LCI video as of May 2009.
  • Little Tikes - Although gifted education advocates call for the early identification of gifted learners, early childhood educators balk at any labeling of students at a young age. Brian, a very precious Kindergartner, presents a challenge to the gifted education specialist who meets resistance to formally identifying the child for differentiated services.
  • Little Tikes: Teaching Young Gifted Learners - Reaching early childhood gifted students poses special challenges to teachers at Sebring Elementary School. Assessment, differentiation, teacher collaboration, and curriculum compacting are the nuts and bolts that enliven philosophical differences among two dedicated professionals.
  • Little Women - Three gifted adolescent females are the subject of disagreement between the school guidance counselor and gifted education teacher. The two educators do not see eye to eye on the issues facing Jakki, Joanie, and Jane. Nor do they agree on how best to advance the development of each young woman.
  • Looking for Giftedness in All the Wrong Places - A school district oversight committee is meeting to consider several appeals on student referrals for gifted education services. As the committee members consider the cases, it is apparent that they are not in agreement about the nature of giftedness, whether the given students possess characteristics and traits of giftedness, and what student needs warrant differentiated services in their schools.
  • Making the Grade - A student council president proposes instituting student evaluations of teachers at the end of courses. Not surprisingly, this independently-minded high school faculty raises concerns about the legitimacy of student evaluations.
  • Manheim Central High School - Students and staff at Manheim Central High School have a way of getting things done. People are in motion, from watering the tomato plants in the school greenhouse to digitally recording music compositions. Student test scores are consistent and above the state average. And now, school administrators in the district are educating themselves about change and how to make it happen in a town committed to tradition.
  • Match Makers - Like teachers nationwide, educators at Greyfield School's Department of Special Services are facing demographic shifts, increased accountability, and challenges posed by scarce personnel resources. Faculty members work to assess student needs as a first step in providing ESOL and special education services.
  • Match Makers (Wiley Demo) - Like teachers nationwide, educators at Greyfield School's Department of Special Services are facing demographic shifts, increased accountability, and challenges posed by scarce personnel resources. Faculty members work to assess student needs as a first step in providing ESOL and special education services.
  • Measure Up - State technology coordinator Cheryl Toman initiates a state-wide assessment of the effectiveness of teachers' technology integration. Clark County's Superintendent Tony Salvio and three principals strive to balance demands of the technology initiative with needs to increase achievement, lower truancy, and support ESOL students.
  • Meeting of the Minds - Now that Valerie and Monica both teach on the sixth-grade team, they're swapping ideas and technology resources. Finding ways to deepen their collaboration and include other team members are next steps for these two dedicated teachers.
  • Meeting Them Where They Are - From the moment he began teaching at Forbes Road Career and Technical Center, George Karnbauer knew that a "one size fits all" curriculum would not work with his students. As a result, students in George's class listen to lectures, collaborate in small groups, complete individual projects, and, at times, work through content at their own pace. Such steps not only help George manage his classroom better, they ensure mastery of the material and boost students' success.
  • Melting Pot: Teaching LEP Gifted Students - Culturally diverse gifted learners are often underrepresented in gifted education programming. Platte Grainger is a young student being considered for gifted education services. His limited English proficiency may be interfering with his testing success, posing new challenges for the educators serving him.
  • Melting Pot? - Culturally diverse gifted learners are traditionally underrepresented in gifted education programming. Platte Grainger is a young student being considered for eligibility for gifted education services. However, his identification profile presents concerns to many of the members of the school eligibility committee. The case focuses on the unique nature and needs of culturally diverse students and the impact of ethnicity, race, and limited English proficiency on educational programming. Not all educators welcome a more diverse gifted program.
  • Middle School Instructional Strategies - Effective instructional strategies for middle school learners develop critical and creative thinking skills. In these videos you'll see teachers and students working together using several best practice strategies.
  • Missing the Mark - Experienced math teacher Lucy Hamilton wants to update her lessons by including technology. She's hoping her revamped lessons will motivate and engage students.
  • Mix it Up - After implementing the Schoolwide Enrichment Model (SEM), sixth-grade teacher Elizabeth Maleganos decides to shift the teaching strategies she uses with her social studies students. Her new approach blends cooperative learning, student-centered instruction, and authentic assessments, providing both solutions and new challenges for her and her students.
  • Module II: The Capacities for Imaginative Learning - Since their introduction at High School for Arts, Imagination and Inquiry, the Capacities have become part of the work at all Institute Focus Schools, where imaginative learning through aesthetic education has been incorporated throughout the school. This exploration is now expanding across all Institute work. In this module, you join with us as you discover what you and your students might learn as you study works of art and extend that learning across your curriculum.
  • Module III: The Planning Session - In this session you will experience a planning session as if you were going to incorporate "Ghostcatching" in your curriculum. To further your thinking, there are also video studies of planning sessions that were conducted by LCI teaching artists with other classroom teachers around different works of art.
  • Money Matters - Now that they've graduated from high school and are independent, Susan and Kayla face different pressures as they deal with money.
  • Most Likely to Thrive - Learning math (in this case, probability) can be influenced by students' language skills. The Dual Language Enrichment Program at Cameron Elementary School immerses language minority and majority students in Spanish and English. A third-grade teacher and two parents wonder if language immersion will help or hinder students to think and behave like budding mathematicians. Is it reasonable to expect different curricula to "interact," producing deep understanding of content while shaping intellectual skills?
  • Moving Target - David, Kayla, and Susan rethink their choice of career or technical school and college.
  • Moving Up - The focus of the case is a middle school gifted girl who is advanced in mathematics. Even though she is starting seventh grade, she has exhausted all of the math offerings available to her in the middle school. The gifted education coordinator for the Randallstown School District is advocating that she continue her mathematics studies by participating in a high course via distance learning. The issues surrounding this decision reveals much about the socio-emotional traits and needs of gifted adolescents. Best practices for intervention are also discussed.
  • NBPTS: Beyond the Classroom - How rare for an administrator to have more talent on her staff than she knows how to handle. Such may be the case here. National Board Certified Teachers (NBCTs) represent a new level of expertise in schools. They hold great promise, and they also carry with them rising expectations for their professional behavior. Will administrators blend the basic ingredients of talent and expectations to yield frustration or will they produce success?
  • NCTI Case - Explore organizational, ethical, and cultural issues by following the travails of Apogee Broadband Communications Company.
  • New Year, New Opportunities: School of the Future Students - As they begin their second year at the School of the Future, Qasan and Ryan face new challenges, including the introduction of a new school principal. They also have access to new opportunities both in and out of the classroom. Both students seem determined to make the most of their time at the school and are beginning to think about the future as well.
  • Newcomers’ High - Set in New York City, this video case examines the education of immigrants from various cultural backgrounds who encounter inclusion and exclusion problems in a foreign land. Discussion involves such topics as cultural and language barriers, diversity, peer pressure, and how curriculum can meet the needs of these students.
  • Now What? - Increasing accountability has resulted in increased assessment of student progress. Shaunna strives to make learning fun for her students and to support their social and emotional growth. Meanwhile, her focus on literacy instruction has generated some unexpected challenges. Making meaningful connections between assessment results and instructional decisions creates a real test for this new teacher.
  • Now What? (Assessment Demo) - Increasing accountability has resulted in increased assessment of student progress. Shaunna strives to make learning fun for her students and to support their social and emotional growth. Meanwhile, her focus on literacy instruction has generated some unexpected challenges. Making meaningful connections between assessment results and instructional decisions creates a real test for this new teacher.
  • Now What? (WG) - Increasing accountability has resulted in increased assessment of student progress. Shaunna strives to make learning fun for her students and to support their social and emotional growth. Meanwhile, her focus on literacy instruction has generated some unexpected challenges. Making meaningful connections between assessment results and instructional decisions creates a real test for this new teacher.
  • On The Same Page - Preschool parent Elena Thurstrum struggles with making sense of her daughter Courtney's reading readiness. She finds little comfort in Courtney's teacher's reassurances and continued focus on social issues. Eventually, Elena begins searching elsewhere for solutions.
  • One of Those Days - Mitch Newman, the technology coordinator at Jackson Middle School, and his assistant, Katie Dietz, struggle to help the faculty integrate new technology into their curricula, while the entire school also wrestles with statewide education standards.
  • One Size Fits Few - When Margaret Thompson shares her carefully designed unit with the second grade teaching team, she's hoping to impress her new colleagues. Their lukewarm response mirrors that of her students, and she's forced to reconsider how she teaches. An observation of her colleagues' reading workshop gives her insight into how differentiating instruction might lead to better student engagement.
  • Overwhelmed - Glen attended boarding school, and now he is learning what it means to teach in one. The work never ceases, but it is not without rewards. Will Glen learn to survive and prosper in this world?
  • Pandora’s Box - First grade teacher Maxie Ferndon tries to overcome her jealousy when her colleague Judith receives a SMARTBoard to support her ESOL students. Maxie is forced to collaborate more closely with the object of her envy to meet district expectations for technology-enhanced instruction.
  • Park Street Elementary School - Park Street Elementary School has a student body that is almost 100% minority. The teachers and administration at the school work together to uphold the school's educational philosophy: "Engaging Instruction, Empowering Achievement. Every Day, Every Child, No Excuses."
  • Park View - Pilar Rios begins an ESOL internship at Park Street Elementary, where teachers and administration work together to uphold the school's educational philosophy: "Engaging Instruction, Empowering Achievement. Every Day, Every Child, No Excuses."
  • Pennsylvania Partners in Learning: Technology In the Classroom - In Pennsylvania, school reform means an influx of instructional technology. Whether using grant funding or district monies, high schools across the state are making strides to advance teachers and students into the 21st century. Full-length lessons using various levels of technology integration are featured in this site. Use the links below to navigate through virtual classrooms.
  • Picture Perfect - Caroline makes it all look so easy. She skates competitively, earns straight A's, and is popular, too.
  • Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School - With sixty percent of graduating students reading at grade level, and Classrooms For the Future funding on the way, administrators at Plymouth-Whitemarsh High School realized there was much more they could be doing to reach all the students in their school. Doing so meant implementing a diverse array of reforms, from boosting literacy to integrating technology to post-secondary preparation, and focusing on students reading below grade level as well as those "in the middle," who, while they might graduate, might do so without any real plan for the future.
  • Preparing Independent School Teachers - Independent school teachers typically have deep knowledge of their content areas, but many novices have little or no formal experience in the classroom. To help prepare and support those entering the profession, associations of independent schools across the country offer a variety of programs.
  • Project Cape Town - This teaching case focuses on educational vignettes in three South African high schools that were among the first to integrate prior to the election of Nelson Mandela. The case encourages people to think about educational life in places that are distant, both geographically and philosophically
  • Project Cuba - This case focuses on the importance and quality of education in Cuba. The significance of teachers, the values and achievements of students, the influx of technology, and the importance of agriculture to schooling are explored. Individuals are enabled and encouraged to look beyond stereotypes and to analyze objectively the educational system of this small nation.
  • Project New Delhi - Composed of slices of life from classrooms in New Delhi, India, this multimedia case is designed to bring a global perspective to educators by encouraging the use of technology. As perhaps the most culturally and ethnically diverse country in the world, India provides a context for learning and appreciating diversity.
  • Pushing Buttons - John Tyler, a new teacher at the Wentworth Day School, thought his Master's degree prepared him for daily life in the classroom. But his first teaching position presents challenges he did not expect. One student throws John off-balance during a classroom activity and makes him wonder about his career choice.
  • Raising the Bar - Seniors Jackie and Val struggle to balance the academic demands of Advanced Placement Statistics with their busy lives outside of the classroom. Larry Stover, new to teaching an AP course, keeps expectations high for his students and looks for ways to motivate them before the AP exam.
  • Reading Champs - Community members rise to the occasion and volunteer to support a literacy-tutoring program. Thankful for the help, the Hagerman Elementary School staff designs the tutoring instruction and coordinates materials. Meanwhile, they must deal with community misconceptions and the challenges of managing a corps of volunteers.
  • Ready or Not - The greatest educational gains are made at the earliest points in pupils' lives. Reading is key to early and continued success. With the changing demographics of his school, Principal Hanson seeks to involve outside consultants and his own teachers in shaping a literacy program that will meet the needs of a diverse community. Has he discovered the basic principles of building collaborations to advance data-driven solutions for children in need?
  • Ready to Rumble - New teachers in a New York City middle school begin the year with a directive to form smaller learning communities. Some wonder how Lee, their new team leader, will overcome resistance and focus their efforts.
  • Ready, Set, Go - At San Sebastian College-Recoletos in Manila, Liza Romero challenges her students and keeps current with new curricular developments. Her students appreciate how hard she works to prepare them for careers in networking and enjoy the hands-on activities she includes. But Liza can be intimidating, and students are sometimes reluctant to ask for help.
  • Reality Check - High school students, the district gifted education coordinator, and classroom teachers each find they need to shift gears when reality doesn't match their expectations.
  • Restoration Bay Case - Teachers adapt an interdisciplinary unit designed to increase problem-solving and cooperative learning skills. The teachers learn about planning interdisciplinary units, delivering those units, setting expectations for student success, and forming effective cooperative learning groups.
  • Richard R. Green High School of Teaching - At Richard R. Green High School of Teaching on Manhattan's Upper East Side, Principal Isabel DiMola leads her staff and students to success through an innovative intervention program that focuses on literacy.
  • Right On Target - Ken Donohue becomes principal of Merriweather High School at a time of crisis. Charged by the superintendent with "fixing" the school, Ken believes building reading skills in all content areas is the key to improvement.
  • Roads to Reform: Freedom Area High School - In the second year of the CFF grant, Freedom Area High School has almost achieved a one-to-one ratio of students to computers. Their focus on Rigor, Relevance, Relationships, and Reflection has come to life through a school-wide infusion of technology. As they continue to push forward, professional development, assessment, and teacher collaboration have increasing importance.
  • Room to Grow - When teaching becomes routine, Christine Whiting seeks new professional challenges. Currently a competent ESOL teacher, she wants to incorporate new content and try new methods to reinvigorate her teaching. While her principal supports these goals, she also urges Christine to push herself in different ways. Christine feels stymied and confused by her administrator's suggestions.
  • Room to Grow (Wiley Demo) - When teaching becomes routine, Christine Whiting seeks new professional challenges. Currently a competent ESOL teacher, she wants to incorporate new content and try new methods to reinvigorate her teaching. While her principal supports these goals, she also urges Christine to push herself in different ways. Christine feels stymied and confused by her administrator's suggestions.
  • School of the Future - Designed with the "average student" in mind, the School of the Future serves a high-poverty, at-risk student population. The partners--the School District of Philadelphia and the Microsoft Partners in Learning Program--believe their thoughtful, student-centered approach can provide a model for other school districts.
  • Scranton High School - During its birth as an industrial center in the early 19th century, Scranton, Pennsylvania attracted immigrants, many from Eastern Europe. Now, in the early 21st century, it continues to welcome visitors from all over the world. The changing demographics are clearly seen in at Scranton High School, which graduated nearly 500 students from over 40 countries in 2006. Teachers address these changing needs through the use of technology and intensive ESL classes, while they also strive to support achievement in the greater student population.
  • Selecting a Winner - Giving student awards can have the unintended effect of alienating some school community members, as Principal Farndale is about to learn. Do awards programs rely too heavily on grades and standardized measures of students in the academic track? How can participation in award programs be used to increase student motivation? What ethically and legally defensible actions might be taken to ensure that all students have equal opportunities to compete for awards?
  • Shifting Gears - Former fifth-grade teacher Chelsea has high expectations for her new full-day kindergarten class. She soon realizes that, due to scheduling conflicts and mixed achievement levels, her idealistic lesson plans may need a little more improvisation than she had initially anticipated. She contacts a more experienced teacher for advice as she tries to make the most of reading time and learn more about her students' needs - and how to meet them.
  • Show Me the Money - Andy and Carlos scramble to get their financial aid forms completed on time - and then to make sense of the results.
  • Silver Surfer - Alvin, a tech-savvy 84 year-old with a kidney disorder, manages multiple medications, an exercise regime, and a busy social life. During a brief stay at Dalton General Hospital, he actively participates in his care.
  • Slam Dunk - Terrell isn't acting like his usual self, and his friend Shauquan isn't quite sure why.
  • Snow Plow - Following a recent blizzard, Kim Sekel finds herself reflecting on what drew her to the classroom. Her path first took her from her New Jersey home to a career in publishing, and then to the New York City Teaching Fellows program, and on to IS 383, a middle school for gifted and talented students. After struggling to find her feet as a new teacher, make sense of her new status as a minority among mostly African-American students, and get a firm grasp of the curriculum, Kim is able to reflect on her first year blunders and subsequent successes.
  • South Fayette High School - Educators at South Fayette High School are preparing students to compete in the global marketplace. Their strategy is clear: implement sweeping changes in the curriculum, set high expectations for the use of technology in every classroom, and put useful student data into the hands of teachers. Leaders hope their efforts will open doors to post-secondary options and lead students into successful careers.
  • Sowing the Seeds - In the Bailey's Elementary summer school program, Anna and Kassia work with Young Scholars and the Big Idea of cycles and change. Integrating the theme into math and language arts poses challenges, as Anna and Kassia go through their own instructional cycles.
  • Spanning the Curriculum - Silvia Santos struggles to align her second-grade math textbooks and other resources with the new state math standards. While she implements active, hands-on learning activities, she has difficulty maintaining order. Meanwhile, one of her students discovers that learning math can make sense and be a lot of fun.
  • Starr Search - Terrell Starr, a talented and motivated student in mathematics, has behavior problems in his other subjects. This case explores the area of gifted education and poses the question, "What constitutes a gifted child?" In addition, gender, racial, and funding issues associated with the gifted education program at Gilbert Tucker Middle School are highlighted.
  • States of Matter - The students are asked by Dogleg Travel Association to create a pamphlet about Mount Karmit. As they climb up the students discuss how boiling points change for cooking and how the thin atmosphere can cause medical problems for some climbers.
  • Sto-Rox High School - Sto-Rox faces many of the challenges of an urban school in a highly diverse community. These conditions have been exacerbated by a leadership vacuum--the school has had five principals in six years. Through a variety of initiatives aimed at climate improvement and student achievement, faculty and students are looking to the future with a genuine sense of optimism.
  • Strength to Separate - Helping aging partners cope with declining physical and cognitive functioning is especially hard on the care-giving spouse, who may become isolated and depressed. Only children also have a difficult time managing their parents' care, accepting the need for enrollment in an assisted living facility, and finding support for these challenging issues.
  • Students at the School of the Future - When the School District of Philadelphia and Microsoft partnered to create the School of the Future, they kept the needs of students at the forefront of their planning. At the end of their first year, learners at the school offer their perspectives on the school and its curriculum. Their enthusiasm shines through as they discuss their work.
  • Successful Parent Conferences - Home-school relations can make or break an educational experience. Parent-teacher conferences are one of the most visible and potentially powerful mechanisms for building good relationships. Successful conferences depend on several factors.
  • Survey of LCI Practice - What is imaginative learning? Why is it important for my students to study works of art? In this introductory course, participants will explore the answers to these questions through an experiential workshop around Ghostcatching, a work of art choreographed and performed by Bill T. Jones in collaboration with digital artists Shelley Eshkar and Paul Kaiser, and through the Capacities for Imaginative Learning, which are a set of possible outcomes that may occur when aesthetic education is used in the study of an artwork. Aesthetic education is the basis of Lincoln Center Institute's approach to teaching and learning.
  • Talk to Me - ESOL teacher Rajesh Gowda supports his students, recent immigrants with limited prior exposure to English, as they adapt to mainstream American culture. He works to develop their skills - both academic and social - as quickly as possible in order to prepare them for the demands they'll face in the regular high school.
  • Talk To Me (Wiley Demo) - ESOL teacher Rajesh Gowda supports his students, recent immigrants with limited prior exposure to English, as they adapt to mainstream American culture. He works to develop their skills - both academic and social - as quickly as possible in order to prepare them for the demands they'll face in the regular high school.
  • Talking Heads - Independent schools are mission-driven institutions, and often a school's mission is best articulated and embodied by the Head of School. As part of this Casenex series, five independent school Heads, representing diverse schools, were interviewed on a number of topics of particular interest to new teachers.
  • Tasting Day - Emily's day at the vineyard takes an unexpected turn when a tasting reveals problems in a barrel of Merlot.
  • Teach to Learn - John Sands believes that teaching is a collaborative process, with instructors learning alongside their students. He monitors their progress to gauge next instructional steps and ensure mastery of the material. He develops his own teaching practice through continuous education, reflection and mentoring new instructors.
  • Teaching the Teacher - When David Bernstein joins the administrative team at The Friends School, he takes on the task of revamping the new teacher support program. As he begins exploring ways to support novice teachers more effectively, he visits his former mentor, Liv Marin, to see how she works with new teachers.
  • Teaching them All - Under the guidelines of the "No Child Left Behind" Act, Baldwin County Public School system has just announced its inclusion plan calling for the elimination of gifted and special education centers and placing all students back into their base schools. Can one curriculum be differentiated to meet the needs of so many different learners? Parents and teachers at the local school level have serious reservations about the new model.
  • Technological Difficulties - Pam's principal wants her to become the technology coordinator for the school. Pam faces the reluctance of teachers who know very little about computers and feel threatened by the task at hand.
  • Technology and Tenure - Jay Hill, an assistant professor at Foley State University's School of Education, is a candidate for tenure at FSU. An accomplished teacher and a technology expert, Jay fears that his contributions will not be appreciated by the dean and provost who ultimately control his career. Jay prepares his dossier and seeks the advice of his colleagues.
  • Technology and Transition: Sto-Rox High School - Once a struggling school, Sto-Rox High School is quickly becoming the school students and teachers have long imagined. Their recently-acquired Classrooms for the Future grant money is helping to bring life to instruction, and innovative new programs for freshmen and special needs students are addressing academic and socio-emotional needs.
  • The Best and the Brightest - Lizbeth Schnabel, Advanced Placement English teacher, enjoys the intellectual challenge of preparing students for college-level work. Today, she's evaluating her AP students' fluency with the help of Literacy Specialist Melinda Hargett.
  • The Best Laid Plans - David Bayne and Erik Patynen, CLI Network Academy instructors, teach students at significantly different stages in their education. Both recognize the value of intentional design, but even carefully outlined lessons may not go as planned.
  • The Challenge - Elementary school principal Don Ross works to overcome both the powerful legacy of his predecessor and his faculty's resistance to school reform. He hopes a combination of compelling data and persuasive reasoning will begin the needed shift in the paradigm shaping Marlow Elementary School's culture.
  • The Differentiated Curriculum Conundrum - What is differentiated curriculum for gifted learners? Why is it necessary? How much challenge is enough for these students? This case explores these important fundamental issues surrounding developing differentiated curriculum for the gifted from parent and school perspectives.
  • The Gift of Teaching - Aymard Mbona, a Cisco Networking Academy instructor in Kigali, Rwanda, uses his ten years of experience and hope for his country's future to deliver course content effectively. His students admire his dedication and passion for teaching. With sensitivity to their cultural and language differences, he delivers a balanced series of class sessions.
  • The Great Plains - Rural schools have been panned for their geographic isolation, substandard resources, and low student enrollment, particularly when compared to suburban and urban schools. All schools, however, are unique, as we learn in this case. Can gifted education actually work in a rural setting in the Midwest?
  • The Promise - Dissatisfied with the mediocrity of the district where she taught for three years, Kelly left to pursue a degree in administration. She begins a research project in an area where schools face much greater challenges than in her home district, and yet are much more effective in reaching students and developing creative teachers. She's particularly interested in the role technology plays in building these dynamic institutions.
  • The Real World - A dynamic ESOL math teacher, Lena Pryzinski helps recent immigrants adapt to life in the United States. She engages students with practical activities and real-world applications. But how can she reach students whose lives are so different from those of other students in mainstream classrooms?
  • The Real World (Wiley Demo) - A dynamic and inspiring ESOL math teacher, Lena Pryzinski helps recent immigrants adapt to life in the United States and prepares them for success in the mainstream high school classroom. She engages students and builds their skills with practical activities reflecting real world applications. But how can she reach students whose lives are so different from her lessons?
  • The Veil Controversy - This case portrays Naima, an Islamic student in a French classroom. The student wears a veil across her head and face, in accordance with her religious beliefs. This practice places her at the center of the French debate regarding the role of religion in the classroom.
  • The Webs We Weave - Fourth-grade teacher Sarah Faraday wrestles with problems of integrating new technologies into her teaching. Whoever said it would be easy? The case highlights the sometimes confusing, not infrequently contradictory relationships among teachers, administrators, parents, students, and colleagues.
  • The Writing’s on the Wall - Shauquan has been practicing lay-ups for weeks and is hoping to make the basketball team this year.
  • Thomas A. Edison Career and Technical Education High School - The avowed goal of Thomas Edison Career and Technical High School is to provide a pragmatic approach to education that fits students' needs and prepares them for real-world professional experiences.
  • Tottenville High School - At Tottenville High School there is a spirit of authentic learning. Principal John Tuminaro fosters authenticity in students, teachers and staff by encouraging individuality and shared innovation.
  • Truth or Dare - Andy, Carlos, and Susan work on their college applications.
  • Trying to Cope - New principal Barry Smith learns the ropes and tries to cope with the challenges of leading New River Elementary School down a more successful path.
  • Twice Exceptional - Sixth-grader Damon King is a gifted learner with a learning disability. The faculty at Bell Middle School and Damon's family face challenges as they begin to address meeting Damon's unique learning needs.
  • Underserved, Underrepresented, Underestimated - A gifted education advisory committee meets to discuss long-term program planning. A new member of the committee introduces the issue of underserved students and is met with mixed reactions from the educators and parents on the committee.
  • Unexpected Answers - Vibeke, a student teacher from Norway, plans to introduce multiplication. The teaching dilemma results from a teacher's inflexibility in dealing with unexpected student responses and the chaos that may result when the best laid schemes go awry.
  • Up to Standard - There were two boys--Jamey and Kyle. There was a gun. Was there a particular time when the teachers and administrators might have intervened? Did some teachers care too little about the students, while others cared too much? When there is a top-down drive to meet new state standards, how can administrators create and sustain safe, efficient, and effective learning environments under the kind of extreme conditions present in Carver Middle School?
  • Urban Unrest - Principal Davis works in an urban middle school that is racially and academically divided. Davis finds himself balancing support for first year teacher John McCullum with the need to respond to discipline challenges on a case-by-case basis. Some may perceive Davis as inconsistent, while others may see him as a practical realist. Meanwhile, how will John handle class disruptions without the help he feels he needs from his boss?
  • Video Fridays - Teachers, media specialists, and administrators each face conflicts surrounding the school division's new video use policy. Special education issues and community involvement further complicate opinions surrounding the appropriate use of technology at Wasson High School.
  • Virtually Speaking - This school year, Samantha plans to incorporate more hands-on instruction in her ninth grade science classes. She attends and is inspired by a NASA sponsored presentation on the Virtual Lab yet she struggles to convince her colleagues of its potential for increasing student achievement and motivation.
  • Wake Up Call - After a rocky beginning to his high school career, Andy finds himself standing at a fork in the road.
  • Weighing Their Options - Students and their parents consider whether college is the right choice. Some balance the cost of college against short-term earning opportunities, while others worry about losing sight of their core values if they leave their close-knit community.
  • What Did You Learn In School Today? - Three kindergarten teachers collaborate on an interdisciplinary unit. They confront the challenges of limited time, demanding state standards, misbehaving students, ethnic stereotypes, overloaded parents, and sheer exhaustion.
  • What Do You Expect - Fifth grade teacher Mary Anne Brown is juggling a lot. She's pushing students to achieve, addressing the needs of ESOL students and families, and battling her feeling of displacement among her colleagues. Meanwhile, she and her teammates face difficult decisions regarding student nominations for the few slots in the after-school remediation program. Which students should receive this extra support?
  • What to Do with the Gifted Few? - A group of fourth-grade teachers follow their principal's edict to group students by ability for math and language arts instruction. The teachers divide their students according to existing test scores only to find out that they have left an identified gifted child out of the advanced math class.
  • What You Don’t Know Can Hurt You - John McCullum's story tells of the dangers of the unexpected in a classroom when he finds that the students have divided themselves racially and academically. McCullum blames himself for creating a potentially volatile situation.
  • What’s the Difference? - Two high school math teachers, both adept users of technology, work to engage their students in Algebra and Calculus. They use a variety of representations, including graphs, symbols, physical models, tables, written descriptions, and animations to explore math topics.
  • What’s the Point? - Julia Henny teaches two distinctly different student populations at Martha Graham High School, where TPR is being used in classroom observation.
  • What’s Happening - Diversity comes in many forms including race, religion, ethnicity, community, gender, age, and socioeconomic status. This case features snapshots of classrooms nationwide and educators' responses to the opportunities and challenges surrounding diversity.
  • What’s the Objective - What steps are involved in meeting the challenge of differentiated learning? This case explores an assistant superintendent with a district wide hiring decision, a principal integrating test score and skills goals, and elementary teachers addressing competing efforts to raise student test scores.
  • Who’s in Charge? - When a colleague compliments her teaching, Emma reflects on how her skills as a teacher-particularly regarding classroom management-have changed over the years. As she recalls her early challenges, she sees continued opportunity for growth as she matures as an educator.
  • Whose Class Is It? - Parents want to choose their children's teachers. A bright, iconoclastic teacher wants to ignore technology. Administrators wrestle with the meaning of "collaboration" in promoting student success. How will Dr. Edith Wiley communicate her vision of effective teaching and shared responsibility?
  • Whose Class Is It? – CM - Parents want to choose their children's teachers. A bright, iconoclastic teacher wants to ignore technology. Administrators wrestle with the meaning of "collaboration" in promoting student success. How will Dr. Edith Wiley communicate her vision of effective teaching and shared responsibility?
  • Why Can’t Ricky Read? - Ricky is a sixth grader reading on the third grade level. He has an IEP and is really struggling with content area reading, particularly in Social Studies. His mother can't understand what's happening. His teachers don't know what to do, and his principal is faced with educational challenges.
  • Why Can’t Ricky Read? (Wiley Demo) - Ricky is a sixth grader reading on the third grade level. He has an IEP and is really struggling with content area reading, particularly in Social Studies. His mother can't understand what's happening. His teachers don't know what to do, and his principal is faced with educational challenges.
  • Winners and Losers - Elizabeth is surprised when she wins the Science Achievement Award. What happens later at lunch ruins everything.
  • Working with the Team - Team A at Shady Oak Middle School shares different perspectives about interdisciplinary instruction and assessment methods. This case examines collaboration and conflict among administrative, technology, psychology and teaching personnel.
  • You’re Out Of Here - Jeremy Connor, a gifted tenth grader, is having problems in school. None of the educators involved--Jeremy's teachers, his school counselor, his principal, or the district gifted education coordinator--can agree on the source of the problems. If Jeremy's performance does not improve, he could be dismissed from advanced level courses for the remainder of his high school years. The gifted education coordinator fights an uphill battle to demonstrate the school's responsibility for many of Jeremy's problems.
  • You’re Out of Here: Motivating Gifted Learners - Jeremy Connor, a gifted tenth grader, is proving to be a real puzzle. He's sometimes motivated, sometimes creative, sometimes disengaged, and consistently inconsistent. Jeremy's teachers, his school counselor, and the principal try to figure out how to motivate Jeremy and hold him accountable.